Five Tips for Diving into the Freelancing Scene

Diana Allan is a current NYC based freelancer. She recently graduated from Mannes School of Music in 2015 with her M.M. Studying with David Jolley. Previously she obtained her B.M. in Music Education K-12 from Mansfield University and studied with Rebecca Dodson- Webster. In the midst of gaining both degrees, she doesn’t stop there. Diana is currently working on her professional Studies degree at Mannes where she will graduate next spring 2019 with her third degree.

At the beginning of this year Diana was the founder of the NYC based horn quartet, Quartado. They will be making their debut recital this upcoming June at Darling coffee. Also this past year, Diana was Co-founder of the group 13th and Broadway. Musicians gathered to read through different broadway shows. They will also be making their debut cabaret recital this upcoming May at The Mannes School of Music.

  1. Introduce yourself

Whether you’re in school or not, introduce yourself to new people; tell them what you play, what you do and what you’re about. You’ll be shocked that months later you might get an email or phone call from them for a potential gig or project.

        2. Ask Questions

Find people who are freelancing and playing the gigs. How they got they, who connected them, are they looking for players or subs? Obviously ask within reason, but the questions are endless and important to carving your path.

        3. Learn from the spotlight

Take lessons from people who are doing what you want to do. ie, broadway pit musicians, The Met, a well know quartet or trio etc.

        4. Have a calendar

One of the most important things that I’ve come to realize in my every day life is my agenda. It’s like my bible. There’s always the debate digital vs paper. Personally I use both. Both it’s so important to at least have one spot where you wrote all your gigs down and the rehearsals/performances that come with them. Nothing’s worse than double booking yourself.

          5. Unpaid or cheap gigs? Take them at first. Make connections.

That’s where it all starts. From there you’ll create a network. You’ll start to realize even though NY is a big city, the community is small and well known.

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